Fri. May 20th, 2022

These include skyrocketing energy prices, food, labor and fuel shortages, and taxes are all rising collection rates as the country enters its first winter, free of COVID-19 restrictions.

Remarkably, voters do not blame Johnson for any of these problems – yet – but the government knows voters are afraid of what awaits.

Johnson’s tactic this week was to blame the business community for relying on cheap labor, urging voters to stay on the “difficult course” he said was the Brexit benefit of a shift from a low-wage economy to a high-wage one that no longer depended on uncontrolled immigration.

Motorists are queuing for fuel at a petrol station in Ashford, Kent, England on Wednesday.

Motorists are queuing for fuel at a petrol station in Ashford, Kent, England on Wednesday.Credit:AP

He breezily rejected complaints from pig farmers about having to kill potentially 100,000 pigs due to a lack of slaughterhouse workers who said they should die anyway, and anyone who has eaten a bacon sandwich has eaten a dead pig.

His wife, Carrie, who has built her image as a millennial animal activist, is silent about her husband’s confusion of the huge animal welfare issues that the farmers’ association says have been raised by the wasted wildlife and agriculture.

Johnson will have a harder time ignoring the growing concerns of his backbenchers, who are worried that a cost-of-living bomb combined with a higher national insurance tax from next April will be deadly at the ballot box.

“Margaret Thatcher would not have ignored the meteorite that has just crashed through public finances,” Johnson said in his defense.

From the right, British Home Secretary Priti Patel, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak and Oliver Dowden, Minister without Portfolio, are listening to Prime Minister Boris Johnson's main performance.

From the right, British Home Secretary Priti Patel, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak and Oliver Dowden, Minister without Portfolio, are listening to Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s main performance.Credit:AP

“Thatcher.

“If you pursue a policy today that is popular today but delivers results in two years time that is going to be disastrous, guess what the outcome will be,” Davis warned of raising the national insurance tax increase and reversing the cuts to corporation tax.

Loading

Johnson has achieved a marvel of British politics that appeals to former Labor voters in the Midlands and North — beyond the so-called Red Wall — while retaining traditional Conservative voters in the southeast, the Blue Wall.

But for MPs eager to see a plan showing how the party can preserve the north without losing the south, this year’s Conservative Party conference did nothing to allay their concerns.

“We are all socialists now,” said Steve Baker, a leading Brexiteer who once led the influential ERG group of MPs but has turned his attention to fighting COVID restrictions and to lower taxes since the pandemic.

“We are grinding miserably forward, doing Ed Miliband’s Labor Party policies, and we hate it every minute and trying to assert its conservatism, and that our hearts really are somewhere else,” Baker said at an event hosted by the Institute of Economic Affairs.

Loading

The next few months will be critical for Johnson. He has repeatedly refused to guarantee that there will be no product shortage for Christmas, only promising that this year’s festive season will be better than the last. For context, Johnson last year told millions to spend Christmas Day alone to help fight the pandemic.

The Prime Minister knows that his cheers are alluring. He has a trump card ability to dodge what would end other MPs.

His worshipers left Manchester delighted.

“It went through everything and explained how the economy is going to work,” Mogg said, denying that the prime minister was walking around the difficulties already felt by Britons queuing at dry petrol stations.

“It was brilliant,” said Tyrese Romaine, a Birmingham member.

“In the future, we will have to do what we can to bring taxes down again to comply with the party’s core values, but at the moment I think he has made the right decision,” he said.

In the future, Johnson will need more than just good jokes.

Get a note directly from our foreign correspondents about what makes headlines around the world. Sign up for the weekly What in the World newsletter here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.