Sun. Oct 17th, 2021

It was not always gastro-pub food, American lagers and Sky Sports view.

Pubs have long been a cornerstone of British society and social interaction, a place where tired travelers and old friends meet.

Manchester pubs and taverns are steeped in history.

But while we may be thinking of losing pubs as a phenomenon in the 21st century, scores have come and gone over the years.

READ MORE: The rise and fall of the prefabricated council houses that used to be in Heaton Park and at Hough End

These images from Manchester City Council’s excellent archive depict boozers that disappeared from the streets long before Wetherspoons were invented.

All Saints Tavern

A picture of the All Saints Tavern before it was demolished in the 1970s
A picture of the All Saints Tavern before it was demolished in the 1970s

The All Saints Tavern in York Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock, was a beer house in Cornbrook Ales that opened in 1829.

Census records show that the spacious pub had its own residence in neighborhoods with generations of landlords and even servants living at the address.

It enjoyed its heyday in the 1950s when it was owned by a Margaret Lillis.

The waterhole was popular and stood out from the crowd despite competition from the nearby Wellington Inn and Galloway.

Unfortunately, it closed in 1971, and the building was later demolished.

The Bridge and the Crescent

The famous bridge and crescent that once overlooked the river Medlock
The famous bridge and crescent that once overlooked the river Medlock

Not to be confused with The Crescent pub, where Karl Marx famously enjoyed a tipple, was the Bridge and Crescent pub on Mount Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock.

According to Victorian maps, the pub opened as early as 1824 and got its name from its location above the curve of the River Medlock.

It was closed in 1962 when the area around the river was demolished to make way for the Mancunian Way.

Druids weapons

Druid Arms in Brook Street
Druid Arms in Brook Street

You will not get many Druids Arms today, but you will love a pub named after the mysterious Celtic holy men of pre-Roman Britain.

Another Chorlton-ion-Medlock boozer, it was open on Brook Street from 1840 to 1962.

Originally a Hardy’s Crown Brewery pub, the Druids operated as a Walkers of Warringtons company for some time.

Lord Stanley Inn

The Lord Stanley Inn in Chester Street
The Lord Stanley Inn in Chester Street

This pub was named after Lord Stanley, presumably Thomas Lord Stanley, a minor player in Rose’s War and husband of the famous Margaret Beaufort.

Based on Chester Street, the 1820 Chorlton-on-Medlock, it served as a Taylor’s Eagle Brewery Pub before closing in 1960.

Wellington Inn

The Wellington Inn enjoyed a brief rebirth before finally closing in the 1970s
The Wellington Inn enjoyed a brief rebirth before finally closing in the 1970s

The Wellington Inn, based in York Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock, may have closed in 1963, but the building remained, and it reopened in the 1970s to provide good reviews.

Wellington, presumably one of the hundreds named after Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington, was famous for having a football room with a football table, football cutting on the wall and a table by George Best.

Unfortunately, the pub’s renaissance was short-lived, and it closed again in 1975.

Neptune Inn

Neptune Inn, just off Oldham Road
Neptune Inn, just off Oldham Road

Masonic Street, just off the busy Oldham Road, was home to the Neptune Inn.

One of the more short-lived companies on this list.

Opening in 1876, Neptune was known for having live music and often advertised for local musicians to play at the bar.

The pub closed in 1942, and the place where it once stood is now dominated by tower blocks.

Gog and Magog

The biblically named Gog and Magog pub
The biblically named Gog and Magog pub

A strange name for a pub, Gog and Magog refer to the strange, human, but mythical creatures that are said to occupy the world outside of Christianity in the Bible.

Pub Gog and Magog in Manchester’s Downing Street were less biblically concerned.

The pub opened in 1867 and was a long term Walkers Pub located at the foot of London Road, Ardwick.

During the 1960s, it was the core of Manchester’s beat and rock scene with local acts playing at the pub on the weekends.

Online chat forums suggest that popular Manc bands like The Neutron and Vincents played there regularly.

The pub was closed in 1963.

Hope Tavern

Hope Tavern opened way back in the 1840s
Hope Tavern opened way back in the 1840s

Hope Tavern was another Victorian favorite that originally opened back in 1843.

The Ancoats pub used to stand on Elizabeth Street, off Rodney Street and Butler Street, and was owned by Bentley’s Viaduct Brewery, Ardwick.

Threlfalls took over the Hope Tavern at the turn of the century, but the pub was forced to close in 1962.

Spread the Eagle

Spread Eagle Hotel, once run by Threlfalls
Spread Eagle Hotel, once run by Threlfalls

Considered Ancoat’s oldest beverage business, Spread Eagle opened in Manchester’s Every Street during the 1820s.

Run by Threlfalls during the 20th century, the pub was more of a hotel restaurant in the 1930s and 1940s, constantly advertising for new wait staff and chefs in the Manchester Evening News.

The pub closed in 1967 and was later demolished, the ground where it once stood, opposite All Saints Church is now occupied only by grassy shores.

Blue Post Inn

The Blue Post Inn had to fight for survival in 1923, it closed in the late 1960s
The Blue Post Inn had to fight for survival in 1923, it closed in the late 1960s

Blue Post Inn is another Victorian inn that survived well into the 20th century.

Although the pub Vine Street, Hulme did not close until 1964, when mass renovations saw it subject to a mandatory purchase order, it was almost forced to close long before that.

In 1923, the Blue Post Inn was on a long list of public houses that had been denied a renewal of their alcohol license because police thought they were too unruly.

Blue Post Inn had a bit of an unpleasant reputation and had to appeal the decision to the Compensation Authority to continue trading.

Britannia Inn

Britannia Inn on Upper Jackson Street, Hulme
Britannia Inn on Upper Jackson Street, Hulme

Another Hulme pub lost to the major renovations of the 1960s, the Britannia Inn on Upper Jackson Street, began life way back in 1861.

The pub was first licensed by Greatorex Brothers, a Moss Side brewery that owned about 50 pubs in the area.

The pub eventually became a Walkers and closed in 1966, but not before enjoying a checkered history.

In the 1900s, the pub used to put commercials in the Manchester Evening News to sell puppies, it seems the owners had a sideline in breeding Fox-Terriers.

Bristol Inn

The Bristol Inn used to boast that Queen Victoria herself visited the establishment
The Bristol Inn used to boast that Queen Victoria herself had visited the establishment

The Bristol Inn in Manchester’s Bristol Street, was one of Hulme’s leading public houses.

It originally belonged to Edinburgh’s breweries Younger’s House and was later handed over to Scottish Brewers and then Heineken.

The Bristol Inn opened in 1864, closed a hundred years later and was then demolished in 1966, when Moss Side and Hulme underwent mass renovations.

The pub was famous for its special brass plate, which claimed that Queen Victoria herself visited the pub in 1888, although it is not known if the monarch actually set foot in The Bristol Inn.

Cheshire ost

Cheshire cheese;  what a name
Cheshire cheese

This Cheshire Cheese pub was on City Road.

It is believed that the watering hole opened in 1843 and enjoyed more than a century of business before closing in 1957.

The Cheshire cheese was one of the first buildings purchased under the mandatory purchase order scheme in Hulme’s slum clearance plan.

Apartments now cover the place where the pub once stood.

Tell us your favorite lost pub memories in the comments section below.

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