No sign of problems on board derailed the train before it stopped, says TSB

The Alstom Citadis Spirit train left the tracks on September 19 with 12 customers and one operator on board. No one was injured.

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Nothing worked unusually aboard a derailed LRT train before coming to an emergency stop near Tremblay Station last month, although there were signs something had gone wrong, according to the Transportation Safety Board.

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“No unusual train handling was reported, nor were trace anomalies observed before the train,” the agency said in a study update released Thursday.

The Alstom Citadis Spirit train left the tracks on September 19 with 12 customers and one operator on board. No one was injured.

The federal railway has been closed since the derailment without indicating from the city when it will reopen.

TSB released information on what investigators found on the railway corridor after the derailment, but the agency has still not said why the derailment happened.

However, TSB added a few more details to the narrative on Thursday.

First, the agency pointed out that a bogie on the back carriage of the two-lane train derailed near the center of the northern platform at Tremblay Station. The train rubbed against the station platform, leaving evidence on both the edge of the train and the platform. Railway belts and ballast (the stones under the rails) were displaced at the station and there were impact marks on the platform side of the belts, TSB said.

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A photo posted Thursday by the Transportation Safety Board shows an LRT train rubbing against a platform at Tremblay Station as it derailed on September 19th.
A photo posted Thursday by the Transportation Safety Board shows an LRT train rubbing against a platform at Tremblay Station as it derailed on September 19th. Photo by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada /Distribute

The derailed train left the station, crossed the bridge at Riverside Drive, hit a signal mast and switched heaters, and came to a train-initiated emergency stop.

According to TSB, the train approached Tremblay Station at about 35 km / h and drove up at the same speed after stopping at the station, where some customers got off.

TSB’s update also went on to describe the damage, which included a clamp and cut bolts from some rail connections.

Investigators traced to St. Laurent Station to inspect the tracks. The ballast was disturbed for about 1400 feet from where the train stopped on its way back in an easterly direction.

“Between St. Laurent Station and Tremblay Station, along the field side (north) of the Northern Railway, impact marks were occasionally observed on the rail bands, rail clamps, clip holders and bolts,” said TSB.

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“The frequency of the impact marks increased slightly, approaching the eastern end of Tremblay Station. The observed impacts were consistent with some form of mechanical damage likely due to contact with an indeterminate component from (the derailed vehicle). ”

TSB is planning a closer investigation of the bogie that derailed.

The agency has also investigated a derailment of Citadis Spirit near Tunney’s pastures on 8 August. No one was injured and the train was out of service at the time. TSB detected part of a shaft cassette overheated, leading to a cut wheel.

A third TSB study involving the Ottawa LRT system is related to cracked train wheels discovered last year.

jwilling@postmedia.com

twitter.com/JonathanWilling

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