Thu. May 19th, 2022

Average daily COVID-19 cases in the United States have dropped below 100,000 for the first time in more than two months as the fourth wave of the pandemic shows further signs of decline.

On Thursday, officials registered 100,083 new cases of the virus with a seven-day rolling average of 99,893, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, a down 33.5 percent from the rolling average of 150,356 reported four weeks ago.

This also marks the lowest number reported since August 5, when the seven-day rolling average was 98,518.

Hospitalizations have also fallen by 67,321 seeking treatment, a drop of 33 percent from the 101,000 patients enrolled at the same time last month, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The total number of covid deaths, on the other hand, has increased, but the pace of new deaths continues to slow.

A total of 2,392 virus-related deaths were recorded Thursday, with a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, up from a month ago but down from the last two weeks.

Fourteen days earlier, the average was 2,053, meaning the average has fallen 12.1 percent over the past two weeks.

Growth in new deaths has slowed compared to the same time last week, when deaths had risen 45.8 per cent over a four-week period and two weeks ago when they had risen 79.3 per cent.

However, deaths are known to be a lagging indicator and often do not begin to decline until three or four weeks after cases and hospitalizations do.

Past virus hotspots, especially states in the south such as Georgia and Texas, have seen their measurements improve over the past few weeks.

Experts say they are cautiously optimistic about the recent rise in the pandemic – driven by the Delta variant – declining, but they warn Americans not to declare victory yet.

On Thursday, the United States recorded 100,083 new cases of Covid with a seven-day rolling average of 99,893, a decrease of 33.5% from the 150,356 average reported a month ago, and the first time the average has fallen below 100,000 since 5 . August

On Thursday, the United States recorded 100,083 new cases of Covid with a seven-day rolling average of 99,893, a decrease of 33.5% from the 150,356 average reported a month ago, and the first time the average has fallen below 100,000 since 5 . August

Hospitalizations have also fallen with 67,321 COVID-19 patients currently seeking treatment, a 33% drop from the record high of 101,000 patients

Hospitalizations have also fallen with 67,321 COVID-19 patients currently seeking treatment, a 33% drop from the record high of 101,000 patients

Deaths rose by 2,392 virus-related deaths recorded Thursday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, up 19.3% from the 1,511 average a month, but the growth rate has slowed dramatically

Deaths rose by 2,392 virus-related deaths recorded Thursday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,803, up 19.3% from the 1,511 average a month, but the growth rate has slowed dramatically

“Together with pretty much all of my colleagues, we smile quietly,” William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, told CNN.

‘We have not yet put up a “mission accomplished” banner, but we certainly think things are improving. New cases and hospitalizations are certainly down, and here and there we actually see a reduction in deaths. ‘

Public health experts believe that the increased total number of vaccinations has helped cases and the number of admissions is falling dramatically.

In early August, when the summer wave began to pick up speed, less than half of the population was fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

As of Thursday, 56.2 percent of all U.S. residents have completed their vaccine series, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows.

Experts say vaccinations are to be thanked by 56.1% of people who are fully vaccinated compared to the fact that less than half of the population completed their vaccine series when the delta rise began in August

Experts say vaccinations are to be thanked by 56.1% of people fully vaccinated compared to less than half of the population completing their vaccine series when the Delta rise began in August

Schaffner warned that the declines are not happening uniformly across the country and that some regions are seeing sharper declines than others.

‘It’s obvious that this plateau and decline – although you can see it all over the country – is happening more steeply in some parts of the country, the better vaccinated parts, than in other parts of the country, the less vaccinated parts, including my own state of Tennessee, ‘he told CNN.

‘Although we are clearly making progress, I think we are still in two America.’

However, previous hotspots for the US pandemic, especially the South. now sees some of the best case rates in the country.

Texas, for example, which saw a sharp increase in infections and hospitalizations, has reported marked declines.

Over the past month, the seven-day rolling average of cases has fallen 44.4 percent from 18,029 a day to 10,007 a day, according to Johns Hopkins data.

Hospitalizations are also falling across the state, including in North Texas, where Dallas is located, and in several counties in the Houston area.

“We tend to be moving in the right direction,” Steve Love, president and CEO of the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council, told the Dallas Morning News.

‘We certainly can not declare victory, because since many people are still sick, we have some way to go, but we are moving in the right direction.’

Former hotspot Texas has seen cases of COVID-19 drop by 44.4% in one month from 18,029 a day to 10,007 a day

Former hotspot Texas has seen cases of COVID-19 drop by 44.4% in one month from 18,029 a day to 10,007 a day

Georgia, another former hotspot, reports a 53.9% drop in the seven-day moving average from 9,400 per capita.  Day in early September to 4,332 a day Thursday

Georgia, another former hotspot, reports a 53.9% drop in the seven-day moving average from 9,400 per capita. Day in early September to 4,332 a day Thursday

Experts credit the improvements in vaccination rates in Texas, which are behind – but not much – the nationwide rates, according to CDC data.

As of Friday, 60 percent of the state’s total population has received at least one vaccine dose, and 51.6 percent are fully vaccinated.

In nearby Georgia, another state hit hard by the delta-driven fourth wave, cases also appear to be declining.

In early September, the peach state recorded a seven-day moving average of more than 9,400 new infections a day.

But as of Thursday, that average has dropped 53.9 percent to 4,332 a day, according to Johns Hopkins.

However, officials are urging more residents to be vaccinated with only 55.4 percent of total residents having an initial shot and 46.2 completing their vaccination series, CDC figures reveal.

‘I want to stress the importance of not waiting for the next wave of COVID cases to be vaccinated,’ Gov. Brian Kemp said at a recent press conference.

‘During our summer rise, many Georgians experienced on their own how the delta variant spread faster and still led to the deaths of our fellow citizens.’

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