Thu. May 26th, 2022

The Climate Emergency Parking Program was set up by staff at the majority of the council’s request, but did not hit the mark – six votes fell to five

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Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart took the decisive vote Wednesday night to scrap a plan for a $ 45 a year permit to allow car owners to park their vehicles overnight in city streets.

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The program was set up by staff at the majority of the council’s request, but did not hit the mark – six votes fell to five.

Those supporters were Councilors Adriane Carr, Christine Boyle, Jean Swanson, Michael Wiebe and Pete Fry. Those opposed were Councilors Rebecca Bligh, Sarah Kirby-Yung, Lisa Dominato, Melissa De Genova, Colleen Hardwick and Stewart.

It took two days for the council to listen to staff, speakers, make changes and then finally cast their vote.

The parking plan was part of the larger climate emergency plan, which the council unanimously voted for in November 2020, urging staff to figure out how the city can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent by 2030.

Staff recommended the council approve a plan to charge a $ 45 a year permit to park overnight anywhere on public streets, though low-income people would pay $ 5 a year, with the money earmarked for greenhouse gas reduction projects.

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Currently, parking permits and fees apply to about 10 percent of street parking in Vancouver. The new system would also have required a $ 3 per license. Night for visitors.

Also defeated by the vote was a proposal in the report to charge between $ 500 and $ 1,000 for residents who buy a gasoline-powered vehicle from 2023. It would have raised $ 44 million in 2022 and $ 72 million in 2025.

Coun. Swanson said she was very disappointed with the mayor when he initially voted to get staff to come up with the plan.

She said she would rather have seen money spent directly on transit for low-income people, but the parking plan was a start.

“You can not let perfect be the enemy for the better,” Swanson said, adding that there had been a lot of misinformation about the plan, especially about costs.

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Coun. De Genova said the plan would increase the cost of living for residents.

Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart outside Vancouver City Hall, BC, October 30, 2019.
Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart outside Vancouver City Hall, BC, October 30, 2019. Photo by Arlen Redekop /PNG

Stewart said he did not think the plan was fair.

“Unfortunately, the proposed permit parking system did not meet this test. It would have asked those who rent basement suites or work in vehicle-dependent jobs to pay more, while asking homeowners with private parking not to pay anything, ”he said in a statement.

‘And these odd results would be anchored. For example, a few years from now, a landscape gardener living in a basement suite who buys a used 2023 pickup for work would pay over $ 1,000 a year, while their landlord would pay nothing – even if the landlord drives a Ferrari. ”

Stewart said he has asked staff to “find a better way forward.”

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