Tue. Oct 26th, 2021

ONE meteor that blazed brightly across the Canberra sky last night is just a foretaste of what Australians can expect to see later in the week.
Canberra resident David Marriott filmed the meteor streaking through clear, starry skies Australian Capital Territory just before 20.30.
The astronomer from the Australian National University, dr. Brad Tucker, described the video as “impressive”, and he predicted that Australians would be treated with a “spectacular” meteor rain later in the week if the sky was clear.
The meteor shot across the Canberra night sky for a fleeting second.
The meteor shot across the Canberra night sky for a fleeting second. (David Marriott)

Tonight’s meteor was likely the size of a small rock, Dr. Tucker said.

“We can tell this by saying that there was no sonic boom … and also how long and how bright it was.”

The meteor was probably “only a few inches” in diameter.

Amateur astronomer Ian Musgrave told 9News.com.au that the meteor last night was an occasional “piece of space dust” that had “slammed into our atmosphere”.

It was not associated with the much-anticipated Eta Aquariids, he said.

The meteor that was filmed over Canberra last night is just a foretaste of Eta Aquariid's meteor shower, which this year is best seen in the morning of May 7 - May 9.
The meteor that was filmed over Canberra last night is just a foretaste of Eta Aquariid’s meteor shower, which this year is best seen in the morning of May 7 – May 9. (David Marriott)

“Eta Aquariids is one of the best meteor showers in the southern hemisphere (caused by) debris from Halley’s comet,” Musgrave said.

The best time to see Eta Aquariids this year will be early in the morning between May 7th and 9th.

Dr. Tucker said Australians across the country, but especially those in the north, were in for an Eta Aquariids treat.

Galaxies revealed in ultra-high definition, showing the inner function of space

“(Eta Aquariids) will look different from what was caught last night … because you get so many of them in a few hours, it looks quite spectacular.”

Darker winter night clouds mean Australian stargazers are generally more likely to see meteors.

Contact: msaunoko@nine.com.au

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