Wed. Dec 1st, 2021

Police have received hundreds of responses from concerned members of the public about areas where they do not feel safe in Norfolk in the wake of the murder of Sarah Everard.

The murder of the 33-year-old at the hands of Wayne Couzens, a former firearms officer in the Metropolitan Police, has focused on women’s safety among girls across the country.

Sarah Everard, who disappeared in Clapham on March 3rd.

Sarah Everard, who disappeared in Clapham on March 3rd.
– Credit: Metropolitan Police

Norfolk Constabulary has promised to work harder to rebuild trust and make streets safer for women and girls in the county with the issue a central part of a recent public meeting with the force’s interim chief constable Paul Sanford and police and crime commissioner Giles Orpen-Smellie.

Former police officer Wayne Couzens has admitted to murder, kidnapping and rape.

Former police officer Wayne Couzens has admitted to murder, kidnapping and rape.
– Credit: PA

It received more than 20 questions from the public with many centered on the safety of women and girls in the county.

The force has received 300 responses from concerned people concerned about areas where they do not feel safe in the county, after the force signed up for the Streetsafe scheme, where people can anonymously report areas where they feel unsafe.

Sanford told the meeting: “We will conduct patrols in the hotspot areas that our residents have identified where they do not feel safe.”

He said the force was “very much alive for the public interest in all forms of violence against women and girls at the moment.

“Everyone in the Constabulary acknowledges that the events of recent weeks have caused immense damage to the trust and confidence of local communities, and women in particular, in the service.

“We know that trust will not be rebuilt overnight.

“I believe that the best answer that police work in Norfolk can provide is to provide the best possible service to victims, offer support and compassion to those who call us in crisis and continue to promote and highlight the excellent work , we perform. “

Sir. Orpen-Smellie said he acknowledged that rebuilding trust “would take time and would take work” after Miss Everard’s “terrible” death.

Norfolk's newly elected Police and Crome Commissioner Gile Orpen-Smellie has officially been sworn in

Norfolk’s newly elected police and Crome commissioner, Gile Orpen-Smellie, has been officially sworn in. Byline: Sonya Duncan
– Credit: Sonya Duncan

He said: “We must not allow the damage Wayne Couzens has done to public confidence to be his lasting legacy to the police”.

Questions from the public included how many Norfolk officials had convictions for sexual assault, sexual assault, harassment or sexual misconduct.

Sanford said no one added that nine officers in the past five years have received convictions “as not everyone is now in the organization”.

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