Mon. Nov 29th, 2021

Qantas frequent flyers will be awarded loyalty points and “green level” status if they compensate for emissions from their aircraft, cars and homes as part of the airline’s efforts to improve its sustainability information.

Amid a growing study of the global impact of the global aviation industry, Qantas said Friday that it would be the world’s first airline to reward customers who minimize their CO2 footprint in the air and on the ground.

Qantas says it will be the first airline to reward customers for compensating for CO2 emissions from their homes and cars.

Qantas says it will be the first airline to reward customers for compensating for CO2 emissions from their homes and cars.

“We know that points affect behavior,” Qanta CEO Alan Joyce said. “Now we think the green level will encourage many of our frequent flyers to be more sustainable, and that’s a great thing.”

About 11 percent of Qanta’s customers currently pay a small amount ($ 1 on a Sydney-Melbourne flight) to compensate for emissions from their travels, which go to reconstruction projects, renewable energy projects and other carbon reduction schemes.

Sir. Joyce said Friday that Qantas was expanding its offset scheme so customers could pay the airline to address emissions from their homes and vehicles. It will cost on average around $ 200 for a family of four with two cars to offset their annual emissions.

“From our surveys of our customers, we know they think the basics are the right thing to do,” he said.

From next year, Qanta’s loyalty members can also achieve “green level” status if they compensate for emissions from air travel and home consumption, install solar panels or take other steps to reduce their footprint. It will unlock Qantas bonus points and status credits, along with the feel-good recognition of a green digital Qantas loyalty card.

Qantas’ green push comes as the global aviation industry struggles with its huge CO2 emissions, which threaten to make flight socially unacceptable at a time when other parts of the economy are rapidly decarbonising. Europe, for example, has seen a large increase in overnight train travel, as holidaymakers suffering from so-called “flight shame” reject flights.

Senior Climate Council researcher Tim Baxter said it was “better than nothing” to use shifts to reduce emissions from essential flights. But it was misunderstood to use them to tackle home electricity and car emissions, he said, as alternatives such as solar panels and electric vehicles were available.

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