Footprints found on Penarth, beach could be from ‘dinosaur collection’

A set of tracks found on a public beach in The United Kingdom believed to be descended from colossal, long-necked dinosaurs, which used to “gather” in the area.
If it turns out to be true, it could change Britain’s understanding of dinosaur history.

The footprints were discovered by amateur paleontologist Kerry Rees on a beach in Penarth, Wales last year.

The courses are located on a public beach in Penarth, Wales.
The courses are located on a public beach in Penarth, Wales. (NHM London / Peter Falkingham)

They occur over a 50 meter long stretch of coastline.

The study said “evidence of large tetrapods from the late Triassic from Britain is rare” before adding that the spores have not yet been linked to an exact species.

The Sauropod dinosaurs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous were herbivorous and the largest land animals that roamed the earth.
The Sauropod dinosaurs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous were herbivorous and the largest land animals that roamed the earth. (Included)

Co-author of the paper, Professor Paul Barrett, who researches dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum in London, said the number of footprints allows the site to be a place where sauropods gathered.

“There are hints of tracks made by individual animals, but because there are so many prints of slightly different sizes, we think there is more than one track maker involved,” he said.

Two shipwrecks discovered off the Mediterranean coast have come complete with a sunken treasure of hundreds of Roman treasures.  The horde includes hundreds of Roman silver and bronze coins dating to the middle of the third century, as well as more than 500 medieval silver coins found in the middle of the sediment.  As well as this Roman gold ring.

Old treasure horde found in the shipwreck of the Mediterranean

“These types of tracks are not very common worldwide, so we think this is an interesting addition to our knowledge of Triassic life in the UK.

“Our record of Triassic dinosaurs in this country is quite small, so anything we can find from the period adds to our picture of what was going on at that time.”

The Natural History Museum's researchers first became aware of the traces after being contacted by a member of the public.
The Natural History Museum’s researchers first became aware of the traces after being contacted by a member of the public. (NHM London)

Sauropod dinosaurs were herbivores and the largest land animals that roamed the earth.

They first evolved in the early Jurassic period, 201 million to 174 million years ago, and continued into the Cretaceous.

Robyn Mackenzie, director and paleontologist at the Eromanga Natural History Museum, holds up a dinosaur bone.
The discovery was made in Eromanga in western Queensland – Australia’s most remote city from the sea. (Dan Llewellyn / Eromanga Natural History Museum)

In May this year, a team of paleontologists found large bones belonging to a sauropod dinosaur in outback Queensland.

Robyn Mackenzie, director and paleontologist at the Eromanga Natural History Museum, told 9News.com.au that the bones probably belong to a new species, which she estimated to be about 95 million years old.

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