Michigan will not implement CDC’s new guidelines for COVID-19 isolation, saying it must first ‘review the supporting evidence’

Rebecca Cohen

A group of teens serving as 'Covid-19 Student Ambassadors' joined Governor Gretchen Whitmer to receive a dose of the Pfizer Covid vaccine at Ford Field during an event to promote and encourage Michigan residents to go and get their vaccines on April 6, 2021 in Detroit, Michigan.

A group of teens serving as ‘Covid-19 Student Ambassadors’ joined Governor Gretchen Whitmer to receive a dose of the Pfizer Covid vaccine at Ford Field during an event to promote and encourage Michigan residents to go and get their vaccines on April 6, 2021 in Detroit, Michigan. Matthew Hatcher / Getty Images

  • Michigan does not implement the new CDC guidelines for COVID-19 isolation, a statement from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services said.

  • MDHHS will further review the supporting evidence for the new CDC guidelines before implementing them.

  • The statement called on Michiganders to be vaccinated, wear masks, take social distances and test when needed.


Michigan will not immediately implement the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new COVID-19 isolation policy, which shortens the isolation period for those who test positive for the virus, state officials said.

The state Department of Health will review the new guidelines and will meanwhile continue to practice the previous guidelines for 10-day isolation, according to a statement from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

“The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) intends to review the supporting evidence behind this guide while awaiting further information from the CDC, specifically for special populations and in high-risk environments,” the statement said.

Michigan has faced a high rate of COVID-19 infections – 11,490 people tested positive for coronavirus on Monday – due to both the Delta and Omicron variants, the statement said.

“The Delta variant has already fueled the current increase in COVID cases and hospitalizations. The high portability of the omicron variant underscores the importance of Michigan residents practicing COVID reduction practices, which are known to reduce proliferation and risk,” he said. it is stated in the declaration.

“Ensuring that as many Michigan residents as possible are vaccinated is the best protection available against additional variants of concern and reduces the burden on hospitals,” the statement said.

The MDHHS also encouraged Michiganders to continue wearing masks, taking social distances and testing when necessary.

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