Mon. May 23rd, 2022

Refugees and Centrelink recipients may be forced to address Australia’s supply chain crisis under a new plan from a heavy Australian investor.

David Williams, a financial power broker who helped bring Vegemite back to Australian ownership, says the Australian government should turn to people on welfare and even asylum seekers to help with labor shortages around the country.

Sir. Williams said people being detained in detention facilities, including those staying at the $ 109-per-night hotel in Melbourne where Novak Djokovic was detained, could be “given a life” by a system that would revive the market.

“Many farmers have a desperate need for labor to get the product away (the farm) and all options need to be considered quickly,” he said.

Refugees and Centrelink recipients may be forced to address Australia's supply chain crisis under a new plan by a heavy Australian investor

Refugees and Centrelink recipients may be forced to address Australia’s supply chain crisis under a new plan by a heavy Australian investor

The Independent Food Distributors Association, which represents hundreds of suppliers across Australia, says staff shortages have had a devastating impact on businesses and that rural areas were particularly vulnerable.

“We need to keep in mind that the remote and indigenous communities are out there, and we need to make sure we keep getting the food up to them,” said CEO Richard Forbes.

‘That’s the big unknown at the moment … we need to be as prepared as possible.’

The chairman of the Australian Food and Grocery Council, who is also president of Asia and the Pacific for Cadbury’s producer Mondelez, says he will support the release of refugees to work on farms.

“I’m very happy to have discussions with the AFGC and its members to see if there is a program that we could help sponsor or be involved in where we could put people into some of the active agricultural work, “Darren O said Brien.

“Whether it was providing an income or another program that actually gave them a kind of meaningfully engaged work from both a mental health and an overall perspective that makes a contribution and potentially alleviates some of the major (labor) shortcomings, we see because we still do not really have an open market for foreign students or backpackers or others who did much of this random work in the agricultural sector.

“I suppose the majority of these people are not considered to pose a security threat, so the schemes … could be relatively simple.”

The unemployed, elderly Australians and temporary migrants may be forced to stack supermarket shelves to help address critical supply shortages (pictured is a Centrelink queue in Sydney early in the pandemic)

The unemployed, elderly Australians and temporary migrants may be forced to stack supermarket shelves to help address critical supply shortages (pictured is a Centrelink queue in Sydney early in the pandemic)

There is also pressure to reduce isolation periods for supply chain workers from seven to five days to help relieve the pressure.

“No one is suggesting that anyone who has obviously been tested positive would return to work,” Mr O’Brien said, adding that companies rather than governments had to take a bigger role in dealing with the pandemic.

Social Services Minister Anne Ruston said putting the unemployed and the elderly into work could help feed regional and remote communities during the peak of the Omicron outbreak.

Workers capturing the Omicron strain of Covid and having to go into isolation have caused supply chain problems.

The Independent Food Distributors Association, which represents hundreds of suppliers across Australia, says staff shortages have had a devastating impact on businesses and that rural areas were particularly vulnerable.

“We need to keep in mind that the remote and indigenous communities are out there, and we need to make sure we keep getting the food up to them,” said CEO Richard Forbes.

‘That’s the big unknown at the moment … we need to be as prepared as possible.’

Vacancies are now at a record high with 396,100 vacancies in November, the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed on Wednesday

Vacancies are now at a record high with 396,100 vacancies in November, the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed on Wednesday

Independent distributors supply food to 1,500 hospitals and geriatric care facilities across Australia, as well as prisons, schools and military bases.

Forbes said federal, state and territorial governments should prioritize critical distribution services and subsidize the cost of running their businesses during the pandemic.

‘Just as we are getting our heads above water, we have to pay for RAT tests. We should get free RAT tests to service the most vulnerable in society. That’s fair, he said.

Workers in critical industries who test negative for Covid no longer need to isolate themselves if they are in close contact with a positive cause they live with.

Mr. Morrison said last week that this meant supermarket workers could stack shelves at night provided they did not interact with customers.

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