Sun. Aug 14th, 2022

New evacuation orders have been put in place for the New South Wales Hunter region as the weather system moves north along with the threat of flooding.

Residents and businesses along the Wollombi Brook have been told to move to higher ground.

Minister for Emergency Management Murray Watt warned earlier the Hunter region is now in the firing line of the flood emergency.

A building is inundated with water on the far side of the Windsor Bridge at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney.
A building is inundated with water on the far side of the Windsor Bridge at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney. (AP)

“There is more rain expected in the coming days in the Hunter region, and there is the risk of flooding,” he said.

“Later in the week, we’re expecting some rain in the Northern Rivers region.”

Watt said he hopes the rain in the Northern Rivers will not result in flooding, with the area devastated by unprecedented floods twice already this year.

Wettest year on record as flood disaster continues

Meanwhile, Weatherzone said there have been 73 millimeters of rain in Sydney over the past 24 hours meaning it is the state’s wettest year on record.

“Not only is this Sydney’s wettest year-to-date on record by whopping 191 mm (above 1578.3 mm from 1890), this is also already the city’s 11th wettest year in records dating back to 1859,” Weatherzone meteorologist Ben Domensino said.

Across NSW there are 102 evacuation orders and a further 55 evacuation warnings in place, covering a total of about 50,000 people across the state.

Flood waters in Sydney's north-west
Flood waters in Sydney’s north-west. (Dean Sewell)

PM to visit flood-affected areas tomorrow

The prime minister will visit flood-affected regions in NSW with the premier on Wednesday as many areas of the state remain under water.

Watt described the situation as “serious”, and said Anthony Albanese was providing “every possible support to the NSW government and NSW people”.

He added that while floodwaters in many areas have peaked, other regions remain at risk.

A man wades through flood waters back to his home from a fire truck at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney.
A man wades through flood waters back to his home from a fire truck at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney. (AP)

“There is more rain expected in the coming days in the Hunter region, and there is the risk of flooding,” he said.

“Later in the week, we’re expecting some rain in the Northern Rivers region.”

Watt said he hopes the rain in the Northern Rivers will not result in flooding, with the area devastated by unprecedented floods twice already this year.

People paddle through a flooded street at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney.
People paddle through a flooded street at Windsor on the outskirts of Sydney. (AP)

Meanwhile, Treasurer Jim Chalmers said the government’s message to those affected by flooding is: “We will be there for you”.

He said the government is focused on the human and emotional costs of the floods, but admitted the economic costs will also be significant.

“We have seen the impact of food prices we expect to see, given we are talking about some really important food-producing parts of Australia,” he said.

“We know the combination of support for these communities will add up.”

Floodwaters recede in Windsor

Sydney’s north-west, including Windsor, has been one of the hardest-hit areas by floodwaters.

The water is now slowly receding however it is expected to stay at a major flood level until at least tomorrow afternoon.

Locals are hoping it does not get any worse.

“I’m just upset that this has happened but the police have done a very good job,” one resident cried.

Flood rescues and landslides across NSW

Dozens of flood rescues have been carried out by emergency services over the past 24 hours.

Witnesses said if police hadn’t helped the man would have drowned.

Even a police car required assistance when it drove into water overnight before being inundated by water.

Car stranded in Sydney floods.
Police car stranded in Sydney floodwaters (Nine)

The heavy rainfall has also resulted in landslides across greater Sydney.

In the Blue Mountains, the ground gave way near train tracks in Blackheath meaning services have been canceled between Katoomba and Mount Victoria.

“This may take weeks to repair, with the initial inspections showing the landslip is up to 40 meters long, 20 meters wide and 60 meters deep,” Transport for NSW said.

A landslide has stopped trains in the NSW Blue Mountains.
A landslide has stopped trains in the NSW Blue Mountains. (Facebook)
Foam at Cronulla Beach.

Bizarre sight on Sydney beach

Earlier, New South Wales Premier Dominic Perrottet warned the flood crisis is “far from over” as the government rolls out disaster relief for victims.

“This event is far from over, please do not be complacent,” he said.

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